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Posts Tagged ‘testing’

My grandma did not test your OS

December 28, 2011 3 comments

About the title, I was inspired by Alexis Ohanians talk at this years Öredev, Only your mom wants to use your website. And just to point out, the story below is not strictly chronological.

My grandma is not very much of a technician. Yet she uses her computer and Internet every day, all day long. To do what? Listen to the Icelandic web radio of course, sharing her digital photos through email and play hearts, spider and winmine amongst other things. Any of these tasks must be enabled in the least amount of scripted steps to achieve as there is no room for exploration when grandma uses her computer. I have to do the exploration. Read more…

SWET3 thoughts through mind maps

November 21, 2011 1 comment

SWET3 attendees were: Johan Jonasson, Ola Hyltén, Anders Claesson, Oscar Cosmo, Petter Mattsson, Rikard Edgren, Henrik Andersson, Robert Bergqvist, Maria Kedemo, Sigge Birgisson, Simon Morley

A nice write-up by Rikard Edgren with picture of attendees and the abstracts can be found here.

This last weekend I attended SWET3 (Swedish Workshop on Exploratory Testing), which is a peer conference with a clear focus on aspects within context driven testing more than just exploratory testing in itself. This is my second time SWETing as I was also at SWET2, and I really enjoy the format as it is personal environment with a bunch of really experienced people. This also gives higher dimensions on the discussions about testing than you normally have for example in customer assignments.

The theme of the weekend was “Teaching testing”, with all the different angles that can give. Read more…

Categories: testing Tags: , , ,

Context driven testing in passport control

August 31, 2011 Leave a comment

Some weeks ago when I was traveling to CAST in Seattle, I had to go through the well-known border control of the US. All in all, I have to say that I was a little disappointed since I did not at all experience it as very complex or special as I had imagined. But of course there was more control than when traveling between European countries, and I was surprised about the well-informed officer talking to every single arrival in the line for passport control. While waiting, I observed how he asked very thoughtful and deep, yet quite regular and open questions about arrivals and their stay in the US. Getting closer to him made it possible to over hear some of the conversations. A family in front of me almost got into trouble when the father said the children were american citizens but they had some foreign passports. Read more…

CAST 2011 – Testing competition with Happy Purples

August 22, 2011 1 comment

First of all, Ill have to report a bug in James’ blog post. We only got $23 for the worst bug report award.=)

Then I would like to thank for the fun competition James set up, it was really a learning experience and in retrospect I would maybe have put even more effort in the learning parts throughout the exercise. This, and my ability to concentrate may also have been impaired because of the time of day (after 6 pm after long conference day) and that I was still jet-lagged. But enough whining now, here is the story and my learnings that hopefully will help me make better decisions in the future. Read more…

SWET2 and Triggering words

April 13, 2011 3 comments

The delegates of the second Swedish Workshop on Exploratory Testing (Test Planning and Status Reporting for Exploratory Testing) were:
Henrik Andersson, Azin Bergman, Robert Bergqvist, Sigge Birgisson, Rikard Edgren, Henrik Emilsson, Ola Hyltén, Martin Jansson, Johan Jonasson, Saam Koroorian, Simon Morley, Torbjörn Ryber, Fredrik Scheja, Christin Wiedemann, Steve Öberg


This weekend I attended SWET2 in lovely Hönö, Gothenburg. Great surroundings and nice weather accompanying great discussions about exploratory testing. With the experience and great knowledge of the delegates and a good structure maintained by moderators, the levels of knowledge sharing was huge. And I was amazed how long we could discuss those nitty gritty details of a subject. And that gave me some input on some triggering words I would like to share.

Update: The trigger I got for the whole post was when Johan Jonasson mentioned his trigger words at a conference this week.

In my perspective, these are examples of words to use with care if you really want to get something out of your discussions with others, without ending up tearing these wordings into pieces.

Best practices

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Good programmers check, Great ones test as well

March 29, 2011 16 comments

I wrote a comment on Janet Gregorys post about Programmers as testers, and still feel I have to elaborate my comment a little more with the concept of testing vs checking and how these differ. While Janet already cleared out in a more recent comment that we are talking about two different things, I think it is of great importance to have these differences in mind when talking about testing, especially in the Agile development context where the word testing has become a word with many different meanings in various discussions. Read more…

Tester skill: Influential writing

March 13, 2011 8 comments

Pradeep brings up the skill of writing influential emails as a tester. I cannot agree more on the need for it. Here is what I wrote as a comment to his post. Please feel free to add more comments and give me some suggestions on rules for improvements.

Hi Pradeep! I like the way you bring out the need for good writing skills as tester. However, I am not very sure you showed us the very best answer to your own question. Actually, I think Sreenurajs last one was better. Why? Read more…

When does testing start?

January 27, 2011 8 comments

I am currently working in a team of testers in a quite big project. It should be noted that the project size and process limits my personal scope and the things I can really change. The test team has not been there for very long, and our environment responsible s haven’t yet gotten the test environments completely up. One reason for that is that some parts of the system have not been completely delivered just yet, so the possibility to test the functionality flow is limited. But when do we start testing? Read more…

Engineer or artist

January 26, 2011 1 comment

I just read Eric Jacobsons post on testers as plate spinners, and I like the idea. When I am testing a product, I try to get the broad test perspective before I go deep. This would be the same as spinning all plates in the beginning, and then of course they drop off one after the other while spinning just a few for longer time.

However, I think is wise to think about the context also when talking about this. As a part of a test team, having all of them just cover the broad and shallow areas can get you into trouble if time is limited. In that case maybe it is better to manage the team so that not all plates are spun by all team members. I think that is what Mihai is trying to make a point about in his comment. But I don’t like the statement he makes about not having all team artists because they are really engineers. That statement is really about a tester that has a hard time letting go of old process models, and not about the engineer or artist.

My view is that engineers are artists in most areas. They explore the solutions, with or without rules, but preferably not completely bound to the rules. Comparing with the circus artist again, if you have a team that collaborates around the problem at hand they will solve the problem. It will be a self-managing team of artists.

Thanks for the post Eric!

Categories: testing Tags: , ,

Cloud docs for test documentation

November 6, 2010 2 comments

Recently my consulting company migrated all our email accounts to google apps. Even if the main reason was to get the emails on a new platform, this was a good step for our entire infrastructure, where I found a good and easy-to-use tool for my testing and note taking.

Read more…