Archive

Posts Tagged ‘storytelling’

What a software tester does

February 16, 2012 4 comments

After seeing so many of these “this is my profession and this is how different people see it” on Facebook, I decided I wanted to give it a shot for software testers. A couple of minutes searching and pasting gave me this.

Give me your feedback, but remember (1) it is a joke and (2) I am not a creative artist. If you have better ideas on how a software tester meme should look like just go ahead and make your own.

Now I am going to continue my vacation.

My grandma did not test your OS

December 28, 2011 3 comments

About the title, I was inspired by Alexis Ohanians talk at this years Öredev, Only your mom wants to use your website. And just to point out, the story below is not strictly chronological.

My grandma is not very much of a technician. Yet she uses her computer and Internet every day, all day long. To do what? Listen to the Icelandic web radio of course, sharing her digital photos through email and play hearts, spider and winmine amongst other things. Any of these tasks must be enabled in the least amount of scripted steps to achieve as there is no room for exploration when grandma uses her computer. I have to do the exploration. Read more…

SWET2 and Triggering words

April 13, 2011 3 comments

The delegates of the second Swedish Workshop on Exploratory Testing (Test Planning and Status Reporting for Exploratory Testing) were:
Henrik Andersson, Azin Bergman, Robert Bergqvist, Sigge Birgisson, Rikard Edgren, Henrik Emilsson, Ola Hyltén, Martin Jansson, Johan Jonasson, Saam Koroorian, Simon Morley, Torbjörn Ryber, Fredrik Scheja, Christin Wiedemann, Steve Öberg


This weekend I attended SWET2 in lovely Hönö, Gothenburg. Great surroundings and nice weather accompanying great discussions about exploratory testing. With the experience and great knowledge of the delegates and a good structure maintained by moderators, the levels of knowledge sharing was huge. And I was amazed how long we could discuss those nitty gritty details of a subject. And that gave me some input on some triggering words I would like to share.

Update: The trigger I got for the whole post was when Johan Jonasson mentioned his trigger words at a conference this week.

In my perspective, these are examples of words to use with care if you really want to get something out of your discussions with others, without ending up tearing these wordings into pieces.

Best practices

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Tester skill: Influential writing

March 13, 2011 8 comments

Pradeep brings up the skill of writing influential emails as a tester. I cannot agree more on the need for it. Here is what I wrote as a comment to his post. Please feel free to add more comments and give me some suggestions on rules for improvements.

Hi Pradeep! I like the way you bring out the need for good writing skills as tester. However, I am not very sure you showed us the very best answer to your own question. Actually, I think Sreenurajs last one was better. Why? Read more…

Context aware blogging and testing

July 30, 2010 Leave a comment

I have touched this before, and now I think its time to bring it up again. Any story needs a context to fulfill the purpose of people understanding it. This is true for any story, may it be in testing or blogging or anything else for that matter. This is a tough one, since you never seem to be able to explain enough of the context in a blog post.

Recap

In my last post , I actually tried to explain some of the context that I saw as an important part of the posting. In that case, no reader can be sure that the explained context would include more of the unsaid context, and is required to ask for clarifications of this context. That is what happened when James commented on it:

How much context is enough when blogging?

May 12, 2009 1 comment

As of starting this serious blogging again, when I want to write about real experiences during my day, there are of course some factors that have to be stated before talking about what I really want to talk about. For example I need to mention testing situation, team, product elements etc. all of which are the good heuristics for any given testing project. But how much of the context is needed? And how much can I leave out without being irresponsible in my posting?

I have a couple of blog posts on the way, to kick start this blog, but I would really like some input on this before digging deeper into the blogging. As a tester (I see this as a personality and requirement of a tester), I want to be very exact in the context, but being that I risk to overpost needless information. And that sounds like overspecifying systems requirements, of course. This will also cause the posts to be too long for anyone to want to read them.